What to do in Quebec City, Canada

Hidden Romantic Things to Do in Quebec City

By Andrea Syrtash

Explore some of the less obvious things to see of Quebec City by creating an itinerary from these très romantique suggestions.

The Game Is Afoot at London's New Sherlock Escape Room

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 10/11/2018, 4:45 PM

Would you want to be stuck with Sherlock Holmes in an escape room—one of those games where players are locked in a confined space and have a limited amount of time to find clues, solve puzzles, and crack codes in order to get out? On the one hand, the super-sleuth of Baker Street would have every mystery on the premises cleared up faster than you could say "Hound of the Baskervilles." On the oth...

Best food and drink in Cornwall

10 Things You Must Eat and Drink in Cornwall

By Amy Sherman

The best food and drink around Cornwall, England, from high-quality local seafood and produce to top dairy products and traditional baked goods both sweet and savory.
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Waterbury, Vermont: a tour of its local industry of gourmet goods

Is this Vermont Town What Happy Tastes Like? Four Miles of Foodie Bliss in Waterbury

By Anastasia Mills Healy

Waterbury, Vermont, is an unlikely center for world-famous beer, ice cream, and dairy. Here's where to go there.

Police Destroy Semi-Submerged Sculpture Park in the Maldives

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 09/26/2018, 5:30 PM

Police officers wielding saws, pickaxes, and ropes have destroyed the world's first semi-submerged sculpture park.  Located in the Maldives, Coralarium—which Frommer's covered this summer when the work opened to the public—was an over-/underwater project designed by British-born artist Jason deCaires Taylor to be explored by swimmers and snorkelers. It stood amid calm waters belonging to the luxe...

Acclaimed Houston Art Museum Open After Renovations

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 09/24/2018, 8:00 AM

After more than six months of renovations, the Renzo Piano-designed main building of Houston's Menil Collection—home to an eclectic horde of 17,000 artworks, from antiquities to contemporary creations—reopened to the public on Saturday, September 22.  The interior has been extensively reconfigured to make the place less cluttered and to make room for new and expanded galleries, allowing for the p...

New Foodie Arcade Opens on Paris’s Left Bank

By Lily Heise

Posted on 09/20/2018, 12:00 AM

Visitors to Paris have a new one-stop destination for gourmet delicacies from the city’s top chefs and food purveyors. Beaupassage, a refurbished historic passageway in the heart of the stylish Saint-Germain district, has opened on the Left Bank. Unveiled on August 25th, the vast 10,000-sq.-m (32,800 sq-ft.) space flows through three connecting pedestrian lanes built in 1703. By the mid-1850s...

Great outdoor music venues worldwide

10 Epic Open-Air Concert Venues Worth Traveling For

By Pam Grout

Rock it au natural! Here are 10 fantastic outdoor venues with an unforgettable entertainment setting.

A Brand New V&A Design Museum Opens This Week

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 09/11/2018, 6:00 PM

The world-famous V&A museum, founded as an offshoot of the Great Exhibition of 1851, is one of London's most popular attractions, bringing in about 4.4 million visits a year. This weekend, the Victoria and Albert, the more formal name for the powerhouse of decorative arts, will have a presence in Scotland, too. V&A Dundee, billed as Scotland's first design museum, opens on the revitalized...

Two New Non-Travel Books May Change The Way You See the USA

By Pauline Frommer

Posted on 09/09/2018, 8:30 PM

You drive into a new town. It is not a famous place and it certainly isn’t a tourist magnet. But it has a certain vibe, a personality. You start to explore, stopping by a local store, walking through a park, trying the coffee joint where townspeople are congregating. It’s an interesting exercise, but the takeaways are vague: seems like a nice place, you think. But you don’t think more than that, ...

Steel engraving of Walt Whitman used for the frontispiece of the first edition of "Leaves of Grass"

Walt Whitman's Brooklyn: In the Footsteps of the Borough's Bard

By Zac Thompson

Walt Whitman was Brooklyn’s original bearded bohemian. Follow us to the places that shaped the poet in the years before he published Leaves of Grass.

Arthur Frommer: The Biggest News is the Dominance of Tourism by the Chinese

By Arthur Frommer

Posted on 09/05/2018, 12:00 AM

Suddenly, the press that deals with travel is full of articles about the sudden rise of Chinese tourism.   All over the world, Chinese citizens have become the largest source of tourism, edging out the American, German, British and French. This doesn’t happen by accident.  In recent years, the Chinese government has encouraged the movement towards international travel as a means of accomp...

Road trip on the best section of the Natchez Trace Parkway

Road Trip from Nashville on the Natchez Trace Parkway: Americana, History, and a Whole Lot of Music

By Caroline Eubanks

History, Native American heritage, the blues, country music, Helen Keller, and Elvis Presley—there's a lot to see, hear, eat, and do on this 200-mile segment of the Natchez Trace Parkway.
What to see in Iwate Prefecture, Japan

Japan's Iwate Prefecture: Wild, White, and Wonderful

By Beth Reiber

A lot has happened to Iwate Prefecture, in the Tokohu region, since the 2011 tsunami: Since then, it has added Japan’s newest national park, the country’s longest hiking trail, two World Heritage Sites, and a stadium that will play host to the 2019 Rugby World Cup. Here's how to see it.

New Street Murals Animate World Trade Center in New York City

By Samantha Zúñiga-Levy

Posted on 08/27/2018, 6:00 AM

Ever since the events of 9/11, New York City has faced the challenges of rebuilding the area around the Twin Towers as well as finding an appropriate aesthetic for the site—tasks that have been especially difficult given the emotions involved.  In early 2017, Silverstein Properties, the World Trade Center's main developer, invited 50 street artists to do what they do best all over the 69th-floo...

Arthur Frommer: I Love This Canadian Program of Literary Discussions and Tours

By Arthur Frommer

Posted on 08/16/2018, 2:00 PM

Every year, thousands of English-speaking adults gather at a number of famous universities to engage for a July week or two in discussion of the great books or great issues.  Led by a faculty member of these schools, participants pursue a “learning vacation” at places like Oxford and Cambridge in England, Cornell in upstate New York, or St. John’s College in Santa Fe, New Mexico. These one-w...

Huge Projections and New Architecture Center Added to Chicago Riverwalk

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/15/2018, 7:00 AM

The Chicago River has had about as strange a career as any waterway in North America, starting with its namesake city's decision in the late 19th century (enacted in the early years of the 20th) to reverse the river's course in order to keep sewage out of Lake Michigan.  Of course, that just sent the sewage—including the foul runoff from the same meatpacking factories that gave Upton Sinclair the...

Yreina Cervantez's "La Ofrenda" mural in Los Angeles

Explore Latino L.A.'s Food and Culture, from Olvera Street to Boyle Heights

By Zac Thompson

Murals, markets, thoroughfares, and other public spaces throughout Los Angeles bear the imprint of Latinos, starting with the oldest parts of the city. Follow us to the highlights of Latino L.A.

National Comedy Museum Opens in New York State

By Julia Levine

Posted on 08/13/2018, 12:00 PM

Think of the word museum and you’ll probably think of old paintings. You might expect the sound of footsteps crossing a quiet gallery or guards standing watch over masterpieces.    The National Comedy Center, which just opened in Jamestown, New York, shatters that lofty picture in favor of something more fun. If this museum is doing its job, attendees will be laughing their way through more ...

Travel gift guide, August 2018

Travel in Style with These Great Gifts and Gadgets for Every Budget

By Frommer's Staff

The latest and greatest travel gadgets and inventions improve the way we go places. The globe-trotter in your life will love these gifts no matter your budget. 
Try these off-the-beaten-path experiences in Madrid to see the city like a local.

Madrid Like a Local: 10 Can't-Miss Experiences

By Samantha Zúñiga-Levy

Find the best insider's secrets in Madrid with these 10 off-the-beaten-path experiences involving markets, nightlife, museums, and more.

Partially Underwater Artwork Welcomes Snorkelers in the Maldives

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/02/2018, 3:30 AM

The world's first semi-submerged sculpture park is now open for snorkel-equipped art lovers off the coast of the Maldives in the southern Indian Ocean. Dubbed Coralarium, the over-/underwater project was dreamed up by British artist Jason deCaires Taylor, who, according to Smithsonian magazine, has worked on similar installations off coasts in Grenada, Mexico, and the Canary Islands.  Those were ...

Georgia in Hawaii: O'Keeffe's Forgotten Island Travels

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/01/2018, 2:15 PM

Georgia O'Keeffe had a strong sense of place, and that place was usually New Mexico. But having a powerful affinity for one locale didn't leave the painter immune to the allure of others, as she discovered, seemingly to her own surprise, during a 1939 stay in Hawaii.  "My idea of the world," she wrote in a letter sent from the islands to her husband, the photographer Alfred Stieglitz, " . . . h...

Incredible libraries around the world

10 Storied Libraries Worth Checking Out

By Talia Cohen

10 libraries whose buildings, histories, artwork, and, of course, books, earn them a place at the top of any travel itinerary. Each of these spots welcomes visitors and offers guided tours of the most precious holdings.
Dim sum is like tapas

What to Do in Hong Kong: 10 Favorite Things

By Alex Ortolani

From Buddhist temples to goldfish markets and western culture to Chinese tradition, Hong Kong is the ultimate cosmopolitan destination.